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Posts Tagged ‘fall garden’

seedsOver the weekend, I had a couple of people ask whether or not it’s too late to plant some things like squash, tomatoes and pumpkins. Someone also asked about lettuce. I was able to advise them to ‘go for it’ (although here in Georgia, I’d wait until September for the lettuce). August is a great time to plant a second harvest of many vegetables and in some more northern areas it’s time to get your fall crops in. Here in the south, we’re just getting started. August and September are both fantastic month for planting. I did some research and came up with the following list of crop ideas, depending on what part of the country you live in. The list is not exhaustive by any means, but should give you a good start. Don’t sit back and say, ‘Darn, I have to wait until next spring for my garden.” Heck no. Go get some dirt under your fingernails TODAY.

Remember, we love feedback. Please send us your comments, questions, suggestions and idea. Remember, we’re all in this together.

August Planting Ideas:

CENTRAL U.S./MIDWEST REGION
Arugula
Basil
Beans
Beets
Broccoli (Transplants)
Brussels sprouts (Transplants)
Cabbage (Transplants)
Carrots
Cauliflower (Transplants)
Cilantro
Cucumbers
Kale
Lettuce
Mustard Greens
Peas
Parsley
Radishes
Rutabaga
Spinach
Summer Squash
Swiss Chard
Turnips
Winter Squash

NEW ENGLAND + MID-ATLANTIC REGIONS
Arugula
Basil (Transplants)
Beans
Beets
Brussels sprouts (Transplants)
Cabbage (Transplants)
Calabrese Broccoli (Transplants)
Carrots
Cilantro
Collards
Cucumber
Kale
Leeks (Transplants)
Lettuce
Mustard Greens
Parsley
Radishes
Spinach
Swiss Chard
Turnips

NORTH CENTRAL U.S./ROCKY MOUNTAIN REGION
Arugula
Beets
Carrots
Cilantro
Dill
Kale
Kohlrabi
Lettuce
Parsley
Radishes
Rutabaga
Scallions (Transplant)
Spinach
Turnips

PACIFIC NORTHWEST REGION
Arugula
Beans
Beets
Broccoli (Transplants)
Brussels Sprouts (Transplants)
Cabbage (Transplants)
Carrots
Cauliflower (Transplants)
Cilantro
Collard Greens
Dill
Kale
Lettuce
Mustard Greens
Parsley
Peas
Radishes
Spinach
Swiss Chard
Turnips

SOUTHEAST/GULF COAST REGIONS
Arugula
Basil
Beans
Beets
Carrots
Cilantro
Collard greens
Cucumber
Dill
Eggplant (Transplants)
Southern Peas
Bell Peppers (Transplants)
Okra
Pumpkins
Summer Squash
Spinach
Tomato (Transplants)
Watermelon
Winter Squash

SOUTHWEST REGION
Arugula
Basil
Beans
Beets
Carrots
Cilantro
Collards
Corn
Cucumbers
Dill
Kale
Peppers (Transplants)
Summer Squash
Swiss Chard
Tomato (Transplants)
Winter Squash

 

 

 

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Full Disclosure: I was trying to figure out how to keep my YouTube videos from being letterbox. The good news: it worked. Stay tuned for more hydroponics information.

http://tinyurl.com/qfy83jp

 

 

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Ok, I’m a hypocrite.  After posting all over Twitter that I don’t blog on weekends because no one reads it, here I am.  I just wanted to write this before I forget it, since I’m using this space as my journal.

We are using feeder goldfish for this experiment.  Since we were having some nutrient deficiencies, we added some more fish last weekend.  A couple of the fish died the next day.  That will happen with thirteen cent goldfish.  The nutrients have improved.  I think I still need a few more fish for cauliflower.  I should have started with spinach or something.  Now it’s a quest.  The plants are showing new growth, but it’s slow.  The system is not really mature enough yet.

Everything in the water is in balance except the ph, which is still low.  I added some egg shells but they did not move the needle.  We use oyster shell grit at the farm for baby chicks, so if we have any, I’ll add a little and see what happens.  I’ll add slowly.  Just like salt in cooking, you can always add more, but it’s hard to take it out once it’s in.

EzGro Hydroponics Unit

I have my second experiment just about ready. I cleaned out my old EzGro hydroponics unit and am converting it to an aquaponics garden.  Since the tank is only 3 gallons, it will also be a goldfish garden.  I intend to use it for greens and for starting seeds.  I am using hydroton clay pebbles for the growing medium in this one. I think I’ll have it up and running by the end of the week.

While I was at it, I planted some sugar snap peas in an Earthbox out in the sunroom.  I’m also going to start some cherry tomatoes and see if I can grow them in a container in the sunroom through the winter.  Nothing to lose by trying.

In related news, I finished planting this season’s onions.  I still need to get some garlic in the ground, but I’m out of space.  Must dig out some large containers an put them in one of those.

Today was a gorgeous day for working outside.  I really enjoyed it.  Got a lot done and even had time for a nap.  Yeah, baby!  That’s what I’m talkin’ about.

 

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The last two days of rain sure have been welcome.  I went out to the garden for morning chores a while ago and everything, including (maybe especially) the weeds have taken a growth spurt.  I don’t thing the value of rain can be over stated.  Between the absence of chlorine and the existence of micro nutrients, rain offers real benefits that city water can never provide.

We harvested the last of the jalapeno and bell peppers on Friday.  Now it’s time for me to amend that bed and plant some winter crops.  Clover or beans would be best, but I need the space for onions, so the bed will get an extra helping of compost and rabbit manure.

We got an extra nice harvest of turnips on Friday, as well, along with the first of the collards and some squash.  We’ll have beets in time for our tasting party next week and the turnips are almost ready to be gathered in.  I’ll probably plant some clover in the turnip beds, since those beds have had sweet potatoes followed by tomatoes, followed by turnips.  They need some rest and extra nitrogen.  If I don’t get a cover crop in them, then they will be bean beds next spring.

The squash has been mixed.  We’ve had a few nice squash and round zucchini, but they have not been prolific.  It’s late enough that we’re not getting a huge amount of pollinator activity and I am not going out there with a q tip or a paint brush to hand pollinate.  We have a few more to harvest, but a lot of wasted flowers.  It’s no big deal, I just need to set my expectations differently for fall squash and to plant more during the spring.

Our collards and kale look pretty good, if a little behind schedule.  The cabbage don’t appear to be heading and bugs devoured my broccoli and cauliflower.  We can’t grow cauliflower to save our lives.  I’m trying a few inside in our goldfish garden aquaponics experiment to see if that works any better.

Beans look good and should harvest a few soon.  If the frost holds off and days keep getting warm, we may get a few ears of corn.  It’s going to be close.  The carrots are growing, but I don’t think they want to.  Shallots are in the ground.  Garlic goes in tomorrow morning. If the weather holds, we’ll get a handful of late tomatoes.

I think that pretty much covers the progress report.  On the whole, fall gardening is a bit harder than spring and summer.  There seem to be more bugs and as I’m mentioned before, germination rates have been smaller.

Oh, one more thing.  I’m still getting Ghost peppers and noticed a few last minute Trinidad Scorpion peppers this morning.  I love that, for sure.

 

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I thought it was about time to post a few photos from the fall garden.  As I’ve said before, we’re getting mixed results.  Germination was not great and it seems like we didn’t get enough compost in the mix and we have a few nutrient deficiencies.  Nothing that can’t be fixed.  On the positive front, we will soon be snipping off some turnip greens and I noticed a couple zucchini and squash forming.  We have several blossoms, so as long as we have some bee or butterfly activity, we should be ok.  And, just for the heck of it I included one random Chick Pic.

 

Beans and Corn

Beets


Squash

More Squash

Turnips

Chick Pic

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